FACILITATOR FORUM

Sharing inspirations and experiences forum for principals, teachers, supervisors, lectures, communities, and students in developing a successful school

VIDEO OF GOOD PRACTICES

Learning Vocabulary with a Letter Game

Learning Vocabulary with a Letter Game
Ambar makes a game of words, syllables, and letters using letters on pieces of paper in a collaborative Guided Reading activity for students in grade 1 who cannot yet read fluently.

MOJOKERTO, EAST JAVA – Yuli Ambarsari SPd, a first grade teacher at SDN Segunung, created a word game for a 15 minute guided reading activity. She cut up pieces of paper consisting of words and letters according to the words contained in a leveled reading book. For example, from a book called 'Insects', Ambar took the word “capung” (dragonfly) and cut up pieces of paper with the letters ca-p-u-n-g on them, and others with the syllables 'ca' and 'pung' on them.

She made these learning media for a group of students who cannot yet read fluently. She teaches the students to read the words in the leveled reading books. She also shows the pictures and the words Ambar makes a game of words, syllables, and letters using letters on pieces of paper in a collaborative Guided Reading activity for students in grade 1 who cannot yet read fluently.
in the book so that it adds to the interest the students have in reading. In addition to reading the book, students are guided to assemble words from the pieces of paper with syllables and letters on them. "This is a way to help students whose reading is less fluent to learn about using letters and syllables to compose words," said Ambar.

She gathers those students who have difficulty reading, spelling, or arranging letters into words, into a group consisting of six students. Ambar conducts a guided reading activity with them. This is followed by the word making game. Ambar arranges the words on the table, and asks students to look for the words she mentions. "Come on Putra, find the word “kepik” (ladybug) among these letters and syllables," says Ambar, giving the boy called Putra the task of finding the word. He managed to pick out the word “kepik”. Ambar then guides Putra to match the word he has found with the writing in the book. "Kepik is the same as in the book," shouts Putra happily.

Then, Ambar prepares the pieces with syllables on them. " Now try to find the pieces with the syllables, yes? The word “kepik” consists of the syllables ' ke' and 'pik'. Now, what syllables is the word “lebah” (bee) composed?" asks Ambar. One of the students raises her hand and spells “le-bah”, and so on.

In the end, Ambar cuts the syllables into pieces with letters on them. Each student is asked to arrange the syllables and letters into words. After they succeed in doing that, Ambar then asks them to work in pairs. "Match your pieces with letters on them with those of your partner. Then look for new words using the same pieces," she says.

The students are enthusiastic about doing this. For example, from the syllables of “belalang”  (grasshopper) they can make “belang”. The students make as many new words as they can in their groups. While guiding the six students mentioned earlier, Ambar gives the other students an assignment where they look for as many words ending in '–ng' in their reading books. (Dkd)

 


comments powered by Disqus
This Web site was developed by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International, Education Development Center (EDC), and World Education (WE) for the U.S. Agency for International Development, under cooperative agreement AID-497-C-12-00003. The information provided on this Website is not official U.S. Government information and does not represent the views or positions of the U.S. Agency for International Development or the U.S. Government. © 2012 RTI International, EDC, and WE. All rights, except those in favor of the United States Government, are reserved.